Street-wise sisters on a roll

By Carol Schuck Scheiber

Many poor children in Querétaro, Mexico struggle to go to school. Thanks to the Sisters of Divine Providence, school comes to them.

A young Escuela Móvil student is proud of his work, and Sister Ely Carrasco, C.D.P. is just as proud of him.

To best view the content on this page, please rotate your device to the Landscape (horizontal) position.

Image: A young Escuela Móvil student is proud of his work, and Sister Ely Carrasco, C.D.P. is just as proud of him. The Sisters of Divine Providence in Mexico show up at the city’s outdoor market, Mercado El Tepe, on the same day every week. 

Volunteers surprise one of their youngest visitors with a traditional Mexican sombrero.
Volunteers surprise one of their youngest visitors with a traditional Mexican sombrero.

For the poorest children in Querétaro, Mexico, education is often a low priority. Hunger, violence, drugs, and family problems can consume most of their attention. Enter the Sisters of Divine Providence and their Escuela Móvil (“School on Wheels”). The Sisters—who minister in Texas and Mexico—and a cadre of volunteers bring a series of large educational bulletin boards and games six days a week to a place where homeless and very poor children gather. The sisters and volunteers play, read stories, and get to know the children. Their effort is part of an international movement of mobile schools founded in Belgium and sponsored locally in Querétaro by the food bank ALVIDA.

A primary goal of this unconventional school is simple: to build relationships. With a bond in place, the sisters hope they can begin to address the many needs of these children and their families and be the face of Jesus in their lives. 

Mandy Ortiz of the Sisters of Divine Providence contributed to this report.



Besides tutoring, the Escuela Móvil volunteers listen to and share with young people who are drug addicts and lack life direction.
Besides tutoring, the Escuela Móvil volunteers listen to and share with young people who are drug addicts and lack life direction. 
 
Two children have big smiles at Escuela Móvil.
Two children have big smiles at Escuela Móvil. 
 
Sister Lupita Silva, C.D.P. helps an older student understand a lesson he did not master at school.
Sister Lupita Silva, C.D.P. helps an older student understand a lesson he did not master at school. 
 
Sister Lupita Silva, C.D.P. and volunteers review geography with middle-school students.
The sisters’ Escuela Móvil is set up on a 20-foot meridian five days a week. Sister Lupita Silva, C.D.P. and volunteers review geography with middle-school students.
 
This mobile school is pulled six days a week to its destination where their regular students and friends await the sisters and their volunteers.
Labor and compassionate hearts make Escuela Móvil work. This mobile school is pulled six days a week to its destination where their regular students and friends await the sisters and their volunteers.
Carol Schuck Scheiber
Carol Schuck Scheiber is an editor of VISION Vocation Guide and HORIZON, both publications of the National Religious Vocation Conference.
2017 © TrueQuest Communications

Comments

Sponsors
Sponsors

SOCIALIZE

Follow Us